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Something Else reviews new single ElectroBluesSociety + Boo Boo Davis

East St. Louis blues boss Boo Boo Davis continues to spend his quarantine time building a new album with Netherlands-based ElectroBluesSociety (Jan Mittendorp + Jasper Mortier) one track at time. Just the other day, the potent transatlantic collaborators dropped their fourth such Covid track. (We discussed some of the prior singles here and here).

“It’s A Sad Thing” starts with a crunchy-as-fried-chicken guitar riff, and Davis’ swaggering howlin’ and blues harp wailing does the rest. As the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion did with RL Burnside, Boo Boo and the ElectroBluesSociety makes obvious the strong relation between the blues and rawer forms of rock, making the two forms of music sound as one.

As usual, Black and Tan Records is distributing ElectroBluesSociety this hot new track from Boo Boo Davis and the ElectroBluesSociety.

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review ElectroBluesSociety feat Boo Boo Davis

Boo Boo Davis

Boo Boo Davis’ rigorous touring schedule got severely curtailed last year when Covid hit, so he fought cabin fever by writing and recording some new tunes. With the help of the guitar/drums outfit from the Netherlands, ElectroBluesSociety, Davis has been conjuring up a few tracks while stuck back home in East St. Louis.

The first of these came out in January, 2021, and we dug the haunting, trance boogie groove of “Secret.” Boo Boo and his Dutch friends did it again with “See A Better Day.”

“See A Better Day” is another perfect blend of Davis’ genuine, American mid-century blues with Jan Mittendorp’s and Jasper Mortier’s studio sensibilities. Everything — from Boo Boo Davis’ voice and harmonic, Mittendorp’s stinging guitar and Mortier’s funky pulse and standup bass — just bellows out from a muddy, analog-ish and smoky haze.

Boo Boo Davis’ latest single comes to us courtesy of Black and Tan Records. Get yourself a download or stream of “See A Better Day” today from iTunes, Spotify or Deezer.

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little review SomethingElseReview

here is a little review on the new single from ElectroBluesSociety feat Boo Boo Davis.

Boo Boo Davis is one of the last of old school electric bluesmen but even a deadly virus pandemic can’t slow him down much. Sure, musicians can’t tour right now but they can still compose and record, so Davis has been collaborating long distance from East St. Louis with his longtime touring band ElectroBluesSociety out of The Netherlands. It’s still too early for their follow up to a collection of Chicago blues covers, but they got started and already put out a completed track for the world to enjoy.

“Secret” (Black and Tan Records) is exactly what we’ve come to expect from a Boo Boo Davis song that’s been given the ElectroBluesSociety treatment. Jan Mittendorp (guitar) and Jasper Mortier (drums and bass) lays in a trance boogie groove and does just enough studio manipulation to make it spine-tingling haunting, amplifying the blues feel instead of covering it up. But it’s not like they have to do that much because Boo Boo’s voice can sound ominous on its own.

After a year of upheaval, we’re glad there are some things that didn’t change. Thankfully, Boo Boo Davis never will.

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review for EP ElectroBluesSociety feat Boo Boo Davis

Just yesterday KuvVer Records dropped a nifty little EP on us, one with the living blues icon Boo Davis performing some trusty blues covers. Chicago Blues Covers puts in a single release a collection of tunes all recorded one afternoon in 2018, and released as singles over the next year. This plainly titled EP delivers songs that in most bluesman’s hands might be a little tired and pedestrian, but this is Boo Boo Davis we’re talking about here, a character as colorful as Howlin’ Wolf which all comes out in his authentic delivery. Hell, almost as if to underscore his kinship with that original blues giant, most of these seven songs like “Little Red Rooster” were made famous by the former Chester Arthur Burnett. Davis is backed by the ElectroBluesSociety (or should I say, the ElectroBluesSociety is backed by Davis?), a tidy little unit made up of Jan Mittendorp on guitar and Jasper Mortier and drums and bass. With Boo Boo handling the singing and the blues harp, this music needs nothing else. You can hear Davis’ echoed and looped in the background but otherwise, this is pretty much like it would be heard in a nightclub. And maybe you heard these songs many times before, but not in the way Davis & Company plays/slays ‘em. “Evil” is set apart by stomp on the two and four and Davis’ singing the song like a man possessed. On “Smokestack Lightnin’,” Boo Boo howls and moans with the fervor of a man fifty years younger. Davis takes his time getting started on “Back Door Man” to allow Mittendorp to noodle around with some biting lines, as the track is drenched in electronically-induced some psychedelic haze. “How Many More Years” sounds deadlier with Davis’ harmonica altered to resemble an organ, and Mittendorp’s slide sets the vintage feeling for Elmore James’ “Dust My Broom.” The band shuffles through “Tell Me” as Davis squeals on that harmonica with mid-century authenticity. Then again, everything Boo Boo Davis plays is authentic. And with the sympathetic backing of ElectroBluesSociety, Chicago Blues Covers is faithful in fanning the blues flame in the way that only Davis can do it.

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review EP David Philips & Abel Boquera

David Philips & Abel Boquera have been playing together in one form or another for more than a decade, but they never made a record together, and even the just-released The Duo Sessions only became a record perhaps as an afterthought. Usually, the recordings of songs beget the videos for them; here, the videos came first and then the idea to make a record out of the performances caught on camera in Boquera’s studio came afterwards. A David Philips record that includes another musician is a very rare event; none of the prior seven ones covered in this space had anyone else playing on them. So it may be a revelation to some that Philips plays well with others, and this singer-songwriter guitar whiz certainly meshes with his Fender Rhodes-playing friend.

The first two tunes come from Philips’ then-latest album Get Along, and this drum-less version of “Another Day” isn’t really missing anything because the beat is still intact. Boquera’s electric piano and Philips’s acoustic guitar blend so well, at times they sound as one. The funky folk-jazz song “My Gravity” (video above) similarly has plenty of propulsion without the formal percussion. Boquera’s swinging solo only enhances the jazz element of the song even further. The final track is Michael Jackson’s “The Way You Make Me Feel” and Davis Philips soulful croon is a natural for this number. For good measure, he tosses in a nifty aside from his acoustic six -string during the instrumental break.

At a running time just past 11 minutes, it’s barely an EP much less an LP, but it’s a pocket-sized collection of a couple of really good musicians and pals having fun with a trio of fine songs. Ain’t nothing wrong with that.

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David Philips on Something Else Reviews

It might be mid-March but Winter is coming…the new musical concoction from David Philips, that is. The British ex-pat singer-songwriter performed his familiar ritual of holing himself up in his home studio and emerged with a fresh batch of recorded originals. Winter, recorded over much of this still-lingering cold season, is expected to drop in late March/early April through Black And Tan Records, but the folks over at Black and Tan have already provided a preview of what to expect. “Home” is the advance single from Philips’ newest creation, now available in digital form, and streamable above. What is immediately noticeable from followers of Philips is that he went ‘full band’ this time, not unlike 2015’s If I Had Wings but all instrumentation here and the rest of the album is handled by Philips alone and he remains firmly on the folk reservation this time. Actually, Winter could be thought of as a proper follow-up to his debut record. Still, it’s a bit of a jolt to hear his twelve-string acoustic guitar soon joined by harmonica, bass, drums, backing vocals and more guitars. What isn’t different is a voice with the warm soulfulness of Aaron Neville and a bright melody that sticks with you long after the last chord rings out. David Philips might change his tactics from time to time but the overall strategy of delivering quality, hand-made folk music never wavers.